On the need to monitor more than one cerebral artery in future cerebrovascular studies…Part 2

In a previous post, I was asking myself if it would still be possible to monitor blood flow/blood flow velocity in only one cerebral artery in upcoming studies, taking into consideration recent publications suggesting regional differences in cerebral blood flow distribution during exercise, cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2…

I think that it is easy to know on which side of the fence I stand regarding that issue…

Well, I just bought another monitoring probe in order to be able to study both the anterior and the posterior cerebral circulation. Although I discovered only recently that we can do a lot more than I thought with only one probe, I still consider that it will more and more difficult to keep our head in the sand (as an investigator and a reviewer) in light of all this new information related to regional differences in cerebral blood flow regulation.

Exciting times ahead of us !

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3 thoughts on “On the need to monitor more than one cerebral artery in future cerebrovascular studies…Part 2

  1. Surely it depend on what we want to look at Pat? Agree there will be increasing pressure if that is the focus of the investigation, and will also depend on what you want to try and uncover/claim. I found it interesting that I have just read a number of papers that are around 20 years old that are all double probe studies…. Many of them pointing towards the fact that not much happened in other arteries, and only one side/artery did much (these were cognitive studies, particularly spatial cognitive tasks, just looking at changes in blood flow velocity).

  2. Thanks for your comment Ben. I agree that it may depend on what we want to look at and the type of stimulus.

    Still, when authors provide a general statement such as “cerebral blood flow increases up to moderate intensity exercise and then decreases at higher exercise intensities, because of hyperventilation (and the related reduction in PaCO2)”, this may only be true for the anterior circulation

    We will have to acknowledge these regional differences in CBF changes during exercise, cerebral autoregulation, cerebrovascular reactivity to PaCO2 in our papers and take it into consideration in our study design(s)…because now we know…

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